Matelot Birder!

This is extreme birding from the far north. Good luck and keep the sightings coming.
roger dickey
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Matelot Birder!

Postby roger dickey » Mon Oct 06, 2008 10:32 pm

Message from Mark Cutts RNBWS, originally posted in the Camp Bastion Birding Forum

Firstly I would like to say hi to all.

Presently I am nearing the end of an operational tour in Kabul. Birding here is limited to say the least. Everyday I see, Sparrow (montana), Myna & Laughing Dove. If I am really lucky a Magpie or a R-N Parakeet may show itself. rarer birds I have encountered are Hoopoe, Brahminy Starling and Shikra. Other than that I know what the Birdman of Alcatraz felt like.
Question, no swifts, crows or large birds of prey ?

I did get to Kandahar during transit but didnt realise that there was standng water present until too late. I did see, a large movement of Bee-eaters and because of light, lack of optics etc was unable to confirm the exact species. I also saw at least one Nightjar, any comments on species etc are welcome.

Lesser Spot Finder
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Kandahar

Postby Lesser Spot Finder » Tue Oct 07, 2008 1:43 pm

Mark, see my post below which was posted exactly one year ago.

A longer than expected delay in Kandahar proved useful and a short birding trip to the settling pond near the RSOI accommodation was a great respite from the excessive coffee drinking in Tim Hortons and the Green Bean Cafe! A Little Grebe dived continuously around the margins which contained five Black-winged Stilts, three juvenile White-tailed Plovers, a lifer, one Broad-billed Sandpiper, several Temminck's Stints, three Green Sandpipers, one Ruff and five Red-necked Phalaropes. The Phalaropes were a surprise in such numbers but, having checked literature over the weekend, are not uncommon during passage in Central Asia. Cirtine and Masked Wagtails fed around the only patch of vegetation and two Common Mynas were present at the airfield.

If you follow the circular transport route around Kandahar you will find sewage ponds and standing water pools (near the RSOI accommodation). The area is worth taking some time to cover to appreciate the birdlife and the pool by the RSOI and Australian Camp is a must. Citrine Wagtails feed around the sewage Farm and the Bee-Eaters are most certainly Blue-cheeked and European. There is a Night Heron roost within the confines of the Airfield. With regards to Kabul I saw next to nothing from Camp Souter apart from the odd Pied Bushchat and both House and Tree Sparrows. The lack of raptors certainly surprised me given the mountains that surround the city. I would have thought that there would have been more.

Rich

Matelot Birder
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Postby Matelot Birder » Thu Oct 16, 2008 3:53 am

Rich

I must say the list of waders sounds exciting and I am definately looking forward to my day there on the way home. If nothing else I should get dawn and dusk at the RSOI site.

I am interested in the sightings of House Sparrow, I have looked through the groups around the compound and can only ever find Montana.

Will try to add one more species before I leave.

Mark

Lesser Spot Finder
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Postby Lesser Spot Finder » Fri Oct 17, 2008 8:54 am

Most House Sparrows are of the migratory race sometimes called Bactrian Sparrow. Check for large flocks overhead moving south at this time of year. Some will land and spend some time at standing water. The local House Sparrows I found in the waste ground at the back of camp.

Rich


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